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20121001
20121031
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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 9:00pm EDT
united states without it? >> guest: yeah. [laughter] >> host: one of the more crucial moves in his life after he leaves milwaukee and goes to stanford law school is becoming a clerk to supreme court justice robert jackson. tell us a little bit about how that came about, because i want to lead into what you unfold in here having to do with some of his conservativism on blacks and whites. >> guest: right, right. jackson was a, was, i think, seen by then even as a great justice. >> host: uh-huh. >> guest: and he had been the prosecutor at the nuremberg war trials. he'd actually taken time off from the court and gone to nuremberg and been the chief prosecutor and then come back to the court. and so rehnquist graduates from the stanford law school early at the end of 1952. he was, actually, in the class that would have graduated a semester later, but rehnquist finished his work. he was so smart -- >> host: yeah. >> guest: -- he got out early. so he wanted to, he -- it was clear when i was researching through his papers and looking at the diaries that he had actually, that were on deposi
CSPAN
Oct 14, 2012 12:00pm EDT
, correct? tell us a little bit about the position. what is the chief justice of the united states during the horton of william rehnquist and then we'll go into this chronology. >> guest: welcome to the chief has to rose in the judicial system. this first kind of the chief among equals in the quarter. he assigned the opinion when he's in the majority. he leads a discussion of the conference, so he is an important role to play among the nine justices and it's really the key guy they are, particularly in the majority. but the other thing that she says is really the head of the entire administrative office of the u.s. courts. sort of runs the entire court system and that's a whole part of his administrative responsibility they don't have. but that's the chief justice does. >> will talk our god and that decision. let's go back to the beginning. born october 1st, read around this time 1924, his father was a paper salesman and his mother was a homemaker, but she was the dominant force in the household, right? tell me a little bit about mrs. wren quist in a little bit about how she got him to ch
CSPAN
Oct 13, 2012 10:00pm EDT
a month to do what you do and take care of the problems of the united states you are being deployed. you have afghanistan or you were deployed to iraq, so they are not prepared for what they see. and again would you like me to tell you something about the kind of scenes that they having combat? they face a number of things and one of the things that they face is that there is no frontline. they don't know who the enemy is. they have no idea, and they may be in a crowd when people are standing together talking, and okay they are speaking in another language and they say one thing and they will tell us, we are so glad you are here to help us and the other languages something else. all of a sudden boom, it's the person in the crowd maybe even a child. so that is one. there is a language problem. again another issue of the language problem is a car drives by and a soldier on patrol says, stopped. do you understand stop in arabic? no. so the cargoes on, the soldier as is required of him, shoots through the car window, opens the door, finds a woman and a couple of kids dead and starts to
CSPAN
Oct 28, 2012 9:00pm EDT
soviet ambassador of the united states was not burned as a source because we can't believe him, not because necessarily he was lying, but there was concern they were not told about this. there were concerns about listening to any soviet diplomats. the thing about being brought to the country, and so kennedy and excom have a promise, but they really have to follow through and work out how to verify first. they talk about how this might, in fact, be a massive trick, a hoax of which history has no parallel so what they have to do is work out how they can do it, and what that involves is american eyes seeing what's happening on the ground. their preference is to send americans weapons inspections into cuba. castro said he's not going to allow that. next best thing is sending american surveillance planes over. that, in itself, is a complicated decision. a surveillance plane was shot down. he was still threatening to shoot american planes. low level planes came back with bullet holes. there was accounts after the days when flying over cuba, and so for kennedy, this is a decision -- do i s
CSPAN
Oct 21, 2012 12:00pm EDT
. instead of going once a month to do what you do and take care of the problems in the united states, you're being demarked for identification. -- deployed to afghanistan or iraq. so they are less prepared for what they see and again, would you like me to tell you something about the kind of scene they have in combat? >> host: what do they say? >> guest: well they face a number of things and one of the things that they face there is no front line. they don't know who the enemy is. they have no idea. and, they may be in a crowd where people are standing together talking, and okay, they're speaking in another language, and they say one thing and they will tell us we're so glad to here to help us and the other language is something else. all of a sudden, boom, it is a person in the crowd, may even be a child, that you least expect. so that's one. there's a language problem. again, another issue of the language problem is, a car drives by and a soldier on patrol says, stop. well, do you understand stop in arabic? no. so the car goes on. the soldier, is required of him, shoot, through the car win
CSPAN
Oct 1, 2012 12:00am EDT
one of the big changes of any campaign that has been going back 1200 years in the united states is figuring out we're talking to people individually. who are we talking to. and who are we talk to them about. we used to have little information on each voter. we had the voter role, the name, age, address gender, in some places the race, and then you had some information you could sort of extrapolate from them based on that they live. what the census told you about the tract or area. and what you knew about the precinct. you knew some of the some party registration in stateses that had. not everybody votes exactly, you know, certainly throughout 209th century we had a lot of people voting republicans in certain elections. with looking at precinct. and so campaigns arizona assort of computing power increase through the middle of the 20th century. it's way of dividing the elect rate. it's basic triage that every campaign wants to do. who are my people that are going to turn out and support me in order to vote for me i'm not going waste a dollar. who are going support my opponent. i don'
CSPAN
Oct 21, 2012 9:00pm EDT
: you think the united states as a preference? >> guest: i'm sorry i misunderstood the question. why do americans have a preference for marriage? it is conservatives effectively we are more religious. >> host: there isn't a specific reason you don't think it's children? >> guest: no because i think that europeans raise children together without getting married. you are asking me specifically why do we like marriage. we have high marriage rates and high divorce rates. we have to kind of we work out a lot of our family structures around marriage in a way that a lot of cultures that live in progress of washington and people say anything goes, not really in america. we get married we like marriage. in fact the college-educated class's are like in an extremely conservative traditional moment. >> guest: it's like a luxury of the rich marriage. the opposite. >> host: is in their overwhelming -- in fact there is overwhelming evidence, traditional american style marriage, no matter who was the breadwinner, is the optimum way, the optimum environment on average. >> guest: in america. like othe
CSPAN
Oct 29, 2012 12:00am EDT
to the united states was now burned as a source because we can't believe him not because he was lobbying the there were concerns that haven't been told about this. there are concerns about listening to many of the soviet diplomats and then being sent back to life that is what they were doing. but they really have to follow through and get out to verify first. they talk about how this might impact the trippi which history has no parallel. so what they have to do is look at how they can do it and what that involves as american eyes seeing what's happening on the ground. the same weapons into cuba, fidel castro is not going to allow that. the next best thing is sending american surveillance planes over. that in itself is a complicated decision because it had been shot down on october 27th. fidel castro was still threatening to shoot down the plant and they were coming back with bullet holes in the aircraft fire. for kennedy this is a decision device and american pilots into harm's way. whether we send these over today. the verification of this program is about sending american plan
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 10:00pm EDT
a little bit about the position. what's what's is the chief justice of the united states do in the importance of william rehnquist and then we will go into the chronology. yes go the chief has two roles in the judicial system. he is first the chief among equals on the court. he assigns the opinion when he was a majority and reach the discussion conference so he has a very poor girl to play among the nine justices. he is really the key guy there. particularly when he's in the majority but the other thing that rehnquist was is really the head of hired administration office of the courts, sort of runs the entire court system and that is a whole part of his administrative responsibilities that the other justices don't have so that is what a chief does. >> host: we will talk a little bit how he got into tha position but let's go back to the beginning. the suburb of milwaukee, born october 1 right around this time, 1924. his father was a paper salesman its mother with a homemaker but she was a dominant force in the household, right? tell me a little bit about mrs. rehnquist and a little
CSPAN
Oct 27, 2012 10:00pm EDT
. kennedy himself is talking about how anatoly who was the investor to the united states we can't believe them not because necessarily he was lying but there were wrote concerns that they haven't been told about this. there are concerns about listening to any of the soviet diplomats. and so kennedy and -- have this promise but they really have to follow through and look at how to verify it. how it might be a massive trick and so what they have to do is look at how they can do it and what it involves. american eyes seeing what's happening on the ground. fidel castro said he's not going to allow that. the next best thing is sending american surveillance planes over. that in itself is a complicated decision because a surveillance plane had been shot down on october 20,207th and fidel castro was threatening to shoot down planes and low-level surveillance planes were coming back with bullet holes encountering antiaircraft fire when flying over cuba. so to kennedy this is a decision do i send american pilots into harm's way and they have to talk about this pretty much every day, this de
CSPAN
Sep 30, 2012 9:00pm EDT
the united states. it's figuring out okay we are talking to people individually, who are we talking to and what are we talking about? and we used to have very little information on each voter. we have what is on the voter roll and it's usually the name of their age, their address, their gender. the talk about the census tracks or area and about respect which is. not everybody votes exactly through the 20 century and a lot of people are registered democrats voting republicans in certain elections and vice versa. but the hundreds of people gave me a prediction of what the political orientation was like. as of the campaign as supercomputing power increased through the middle of the 20th century in the precinct as the sort of way of dividing the electorate to serve as a basic it could face a triage of what they wanted to come who of my people are going to turn out and vote to support me already because i'm not going to waste in all were talking to them. who are the people that are going to go out and support my opponent because i don't need to talk to them either. who is in the middle.
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 11:00am EDT
things about the united states is people are used to telling strangers who they are going to vote for. so then you come up with a list of how individuals plan to vote and often a little bit of information about the issues they care about. in the same indoors. this is what the core of kansas is trained to identify voters. and then they start sorting people out here to do i have on my site already? who do i need to keep targeting with mail or persuasion phone calls? and so, this is the way campaigns have always worked spirit was changed in the starting and end of the last century coerce her to getting all the other data about people goes well beyond what the senses about their area of what their voter registration told you about themselves. it wasn't traditionally political information, but a lot was by commercial marketers are especially the credit rating agencies to which really had ventures in accumulating as much possible information about demographics, consumer habit, your lifestyle. and what happened starting in the late 1990s with people in politics discovered they could use what
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)